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Arab and Jew by David K. Shipler

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Published by Blackstone Audio Inc. .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • History,
  • Unabridged Audio - History,
  • History: World,
  • Middle East - Israel,
  • History / General,
  • Middle East - General,
  • Arab-Israeli conflict,
  • Jewish-Arab relations,
  • National characteristics, Arab

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsRobert Blumenfeld (Narrator)
The Physical Object
FormatAudio CD
Number of Pages200
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8107384M
ISBN 100786160853
ISBN 109780786160853
OCLC/WorldCa123119515

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DAVID K. SHIPLER reported for the New York Times from to in New York, Saigon, Moscow, and Jerusalem before serving as chief diplomatic correspondent in Washington, D.C. He won the Pulitzer Prize in for Arab and Jew. He shared a George Polk Award for his coverage of the war in Lebanon and was executive producer, writer, and narrator of two PBS Cited by: About Arab and Jew The expanded and updated edition of David Shipler’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book that examines the relationship, past and present, between Arabs and Jews In this monumental work, extensively researched and more relevant than ever, David Shipler delves into the origins of the prejudices that exist between Jews and Arabs that. Arab Jews (Arabic: اليهود العرب ‎ al-Yahūd al-ʿArab; Hebrew: יהודים ערבים ‎ Yehudim `Aravim) is a term referring to Jews living in or originating from the Arab world. The largest Jewish communities in the Arab world are in Morocco and r Jewish populations of people or less exist in Egypt, Algeria, Lebanon, Syria, Bahrain, Yemen, the United Arab.   I found the book to be very promising in the beginning. It seeks to present a very comprehensive overview of the conflict in the Middle East, presenting both sides of the conflict through the personal experience of two people: a Palestinian Arab and an Israeli Jew/5.

  The Jew, according to the Arab stereotype, is a brutal, violent coward; the Arab, to the prejudiced Jew, is a primitive creature of animal vengeance and cruel desires. In this monumental work, David Shipler delves into the origins of the prejudices that have been intensified by war, terrorism, and nationalism.5/5(5). *Winner of the MEMO Palestine Book Awards * Spanning several decades, Ella Shohat's work has introduced conceptual frameworks that fundamentally challenged conventional understandings of Palestine, Zionism and the Middle East, focusing on .   DAVID K. SHIPLER reported for the New York Times from to in New York, Saigon, Moscow, and Jerusalem before serving as chief diplomatic correspondent in Washington, D.C. He won the Pulitzer Prize in for Arab and Jew. He shared a George Polk Award for his coverage of the war in Lebanon and was executive producer, writer, and /5(10).   The Paperback of the Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East by Sandy Tolan at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more! Due to COVID, orders may be delayed/5(80).

  Question: "Why do Jews and Arabs / Muslims hate each other?" Answer: First, it is important to understand that not all Arabs are Muslims, and not all Muslims are Arabs. While a majority of Arabs are Muslims, there are many non-Muslim Arabs. Further, there are significantly more non-Arab Muslims in areas such as Indonesia and Malaysia than there are Arab Muslims. Arab stereotype portrays the Jew as a brutal, violent coward. The Jewish stereotype portrays the Arab as a primitive creature of animal vengeance and cruel desires. In this monumental Pulitzer Prize-winning work, revised in , David Shipler delves into the origins of these prejudices that have been intensified by war, terrorism, and nationalism. This book is about the social history of the Arab Jews—Jews living in Arab countries—against the backdrop of Zionist nationalism. By using the term Arab Jews (rather than Mizrahim, which literally means Orientals) the book challenges the binary opposition between Arabs and Jews in Zionist discourse, a dichotomy that renders the linking of Arabs and Jews in this way inconceivable. This is why I thought that the man behind this fabulous initiative, who happens to be Jew, deserved to be called an Arab Jew, for all the good he is doing in the Arab World. In the association of the two identities, Arab and Jew, some people might see an oxymoron. I see a powerful call for tolerance, and a sign of intelligence.